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Author Topic: HOW TO: Electric fan conversion  (Read 3542 times)

Offline Jay

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HOW TO: Electric fan conversion
« on: 03:15:17 AM / 12-Apr-11 »
Due to people asking for this. I decided to write it up, draw all the crap out, and make a little model using random parts I had laying around. Should be thorough enough for anyone to understand.

First things first. NEVER EVER EVER Wire up a switch DIRECTLY to a fan. A fan can draw anywhere from 15-45 amps. It take a hefty switch to control amperage like that.  If you do it to a switch, it will inevitably fail. Possibly melt. ALWAYS USE FUSES AND RELAYS ON AUXILIARY SYSTEMS!

Secondly. Coolant temp SENSORS, and coolant temp/Fan SWITCHES are NOT the same thing. Do not think that a sensor will work. It HAS to be a Coolant/ A/C / Some sort of temperature switch.

Thirdly. A ground is a ground. The diagrams show some wires sharing a ground. They do not need to do so. Just ground applicably.

Fourth. ALWAYS MEASURE THE CURRENT DRAW OF YOUR FAN SO YOU KNOW THE PROPER FUSE TO PUT IN!!!! I used the broad assumption of the 30A fuse, which covers most. BUT will most likely be overkill for a single fan.

Fifth is a list of the diagrams parts, and what they stand for.
-S = Switch. Switches with a ? (theta) are TEMP switches
-K = Relay. The box is the coil to magnetize, and the broken portion of the -K designation are the NO (Normally Open) Contacts, on the Single Fan (Two Speed) Diagram, the -K is a NC (Normally Closed) Contact of -K1... I forgot to desginate it.
-F = Fuse, Always fuse shit
-BT = Battery, or ANY 12V source. This can be a 12v ignition source, accessory, Or directly connected to the batter
-B = MOTOR. These represent the cooling fan motor.

That covers most of that.

Here, in my simple little mockup cooling fan system. I am using lights in place of the fan, to keep the size down. This is a depiction of the Dual Sequential (SPDT Switch) diagram. The wire colors in the diagram, AND the actual model are the same. So you can look at one, and the other, and it will make perfect sense. So here is a photo of my little creation. A video to come later, showing it in action. I currently have a faulty temp switch hooked up to it. This also doesn't represent the wire guage you will want providing power for the fan. It will need to be much heftier than 16g.







Here are the diagrams, and brief descriptions, and small part list. I have no idea why, but photobucket automatically changed the photo properties, and the Orange wire got washed out. You can see it just fine, but looks brown. The wire colors are PURELY up to you, I Just wanted them to coincide with what you see on the mock-up. Short list of how the power is routed.
Battery>Relay energizing coil>Fan Switch>Ground
                                         |>Override Switch> Ground


Battery>Coil NO Contact>Fans>Ground

VERY simple. The switches merely provide a path to ground. Meaning you can get away with bringing a SINGLE wire into your cabin from the engine bay (On either single fan, OR the Dual fan (SPST Switch) Setup. Only thing you'll NEED to figure out, is how to mount the coolant fan switch. This can be done by putting it into a pipe, and putting that pipe close to the radiator on the INLET side, NEVER the outlet side. That's bad juju on having the switch be measuring already cooled coolant :P

On to the diagrams.

One fan, One speed. Easiest to make, and connect
Parts list:
1 Fan switch, (Single, or dual connector, Single connectors need the portion it is screwed into to be grounded out, as once it reaches temp. It grounds out. Nothing more
1 SPST, Switch to act as an override. This is NOT needed unless you want to override the automatic fan function. In case of switch failure, OR Track day fun.
1 Relay, This can be a cheapo one used for foglights. 6 bucks at advance auto1 5 Amp fuse, For protection of the energizing circuit. The energizing circuit could get away with a one amp, as it will typically pull only 140-150 mA. or .14-.15A
1 15-30A Fuse. Protection of the fan(s).


Diagram here.


One fan, Dual Speed (High and Low)

Parts list:
1 Fan switch, TRIPLE connector switch (Dual Temp). As the case of the E30 switch I have pictured above
1 SPST, Switch to act as an override. This is NOT needed unless you want to override the automatic fan function. In case of switch failure, OR Track day fun.

1 Dual contact Relay, and 1 NO contact relay
OR
2 NO Cheapo foglight relay, and 1 NC Relay (Radio Shack)

1 5 Amp fuse, For protection of the energizing circuit. The energizing circuit could get away with a one amp, as it will typically pull only 140-150 mA. or .14-.15A
1 15-30A Fuse. Protection of the fans.
1 10 Ohm, 100 watt resistor (NEEDS TO BE 100 WATT! This bitch will get HOT in operation)






Dual fan, Low speed, and High Speed Using a DPST Switch
Two fans, ones a high speed fan. One's a low speed fan. BOTH overridden

Parts list
1 DPST Switch
1 Fan switch, TRIPLE CONNECTOR (Dual Temp)
2 NO Relays (Cheapo advance foglight ones)
1 5 Amp fuse, For protection of the energizing circuit. The energizing circuit could get away with a one amp, as it will typically pull only 140-150 mA. or .14-.15A
1 15-30A Fuse. Protection of the fans.


Great street setup with a track override. Diagram




Dual fan, High Speed Sequential Using a SPST Switch and Diodes

Parts list:
1 SPST Switch
1 Fan switch, TRIPLE CONNECTOR (Dual Temp)
2 NO Relays (Cheapo advance foglight ones)
1 5 Amp fuse, For protection of the energizing circuit. The energizing circuit could get away with a one amp, as it will typically pull only 140-150 mA. or .14-.15A
1 15-30A Fuse. Protection of the fans.
2 3A Diodes





Pretty solid now, more to come later.
-J


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Offline dustins12

Re: HOW TO: Electric fan conversion
« Reply #1 on: 07:08:14 AM / 25-Apr-16 »
Are there any moderators/administrators on here that can restore the photos to this thread?
« Last Edit: 04:25:38 PM / 01-Jun-16 by dustins12 »
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Offline Baluds

Re: HOW TO: Electric fan conversion
« Reply #2 on: 09:49:54 AM / 08-Oct-16 »
Yah, I second that. Restoring the Pics. Planning to do this to mine. Thanks in advance..

Offline SchizophrenicMC

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Re: HOW TO: Electric fan conversion
« Reply #3 on: 10:00:23 AM / 06-Jan-17 »
I'm a bit late to the party, but I went through all of Jay's photobucket, and didn't find anything resembling an S12's cooling system, and there's not really anything else we can do here.

My advice: if you host any images on a forum in the future, pick a better host than photobucket, because unfortunately the loss of these images is due to how photobucket handles urls. Our hands are tied. On the upside, the important images (the wiring diagrams) are still up, and I've gone ahead and saved copies in case they go down in the future.
Nah, quoted for future use because not only is it lame and old, but it's a direct link to Schizo posting up homoerotic menswear fanfiction.
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zololn: wheres the check engine light on the s12?

Offline Wonderingraven

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Re: HOW TO: Electric fan conversion
« Reply #4 on: 10:33:32 AM / 06-Jan-17 »
I have also have a good diagram for the wiring on the eFan's with some good pictures of the relays in place and the fused link. I'll contribute this weekend hopefully.
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